Category Archives for "Triathlon Gear"

Investing in Good Running Shoes

Investing in Good Running Shoes

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“It’s always best to invest on good running shoes. Why? Read the reasons below!”

The best running shoes are shoes that will be kind and gentle on your feet throughout any running exercise. This benefit will reflect itself in its most striking way immediately after a workout, when the way your feet feel then is a good indication of whether you have the right pair of running shoes or not. A good number of people even today still do not realize–or underestimate–the importance of investing in a good pair of running shoes. These are the kinds of people who awkwardly show up for track and field events or even light running exercises in the bulkiest pair of basketball shoes that they can find. These kinds of people are also the ones who will have massive amounts of pain in their feet right after the running exercise.

Avoid Blisters and Other Pains
If you use any kind of shoes–even ones for other types of athletic purposes–when you run, you will end up with the most sore feet ever. A further taboo is picking the incorrect kind of socks to make matters even that much worse. In example, cotton socks are a big no-no when it comes to picking socks for running because of their tendency to cause friction against your skin. So if you are wearing unwieldy and inappropriate shoes–such as basketball shoes–and cotton socks that are thick, you should expect to see your feet in bad shape after your running exercise. It is noteworthy to point out that this adverse effect will happen quite quickly, too. So if you want to avoid blisters and the effects of sore feet and the front of your legs, invest in a good pair of running shoes.

Better Fit to Your Foot
Good running shoes will do one thing and provide one benefit first and foremost: a snug and well-shaped fit that is tailored to your foot as much as possible. A good pair of running shoes will also make your foot feel lighter as you run, and a reason for this is because of how well it takes to the shape of your foot. The problem that is caused by the rubbing of your heel against the wrong kind of shoe during running–which creates the onset of blisters–is also absent with the right pair of running shoes. You will not feel this nagging rubbing against your heel. These days, many athletic shoe stores provide in-store machine tests which show your foot type and, consequently, what type of running shoe best fits you.

Selecting Good Shoes
Selecting a good pair of running shoes comes down to pronation. This term simply refers to the degree your foot rotates toward the inside when you run. There are two kinds of runners: One who has too much pronation (whose foot rotates too much while running) and one who has insufficient pronation (whose foot barely rotates inward when running). The best way to get a pair that is right for you is by visiting a shoe store that emphasizes selling running shoes. These stores usually have a knowledgeable staff that will even let you try running around in the shoe. More at Why It’s Important to Invest in Good Running Shoes

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Must Know Bike Components

Bike Components: A Beginner’s Bike

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“Many materials and technologies are used to build different types of bikes. Below is a beginner’s guide to bike components. Read it now”

Buying a new bike or accessories can often be bewildering to the novice; the folks working in the shop almost seem to be speaking a different language. It’s almost as bad as trying to pick out a personal computer.

From our perspective, sometimes it’s hard to tell when we’re using everyday language and when we’re slipping into technical jargon. We have to really ask questions to make sure we’re on the same page with a customer and really understand what they are looking for, and often it’s just a matter of making sure we agree on the meaning of the words we are using. For example, we sometimes get people asking for a “wheel,” when all they really need is a new tire. On the other hand, we’ve gotten really perplexed looks when we’ve handed somebody a “rim,” when they were really looking for an entire wheel.

So, breaking down the language barrier is an important step in productive relationships between bike shop customers and bike shop employees. To that end, here is a glossary providing a breakdown of the anatomy of the bicycle.

Bar ends – the angled extensions attached to the ends of some flat handlebars and riser handlebars that provide an alternate place to rest your hands.

Bottom bracket – the collection of ball bearings and spindle housed within the bottom bracket shell of the frame, which provides the “shaft” mechanism on which the crank arms turn.

Braze-ons – threaded sockets that may or may not be present on the bike frame that provide a place to attach accessories such as bottle cages, cargo racks, and fenders.

Cage – the preferred fancy name for water bottle holder.

Cassette – the collection of gears that is attached to the rear wheel on most modern bicycles (see “Freewheel”).

Chainrings – the gears that are attached to the right-hand crank arm nearer to the front of the bike. A bike with two chainrings is said to have a “double crank;” a bike with three chainrings is said to have a “triple crank.”

Cog – a single gear on a cassette or freewheel gear cluster, or the single rear gear on a fixed-gear bike.

Crank arms – the pedals screw into these; these bolt onto the bottom bracket spindle.

Cyclocomputer – the preferred fancy word for an electronic speedometer/odometer.

Derailer – the device that is bolted to the frame that handles the job of moving the chain from one gear to another when you shift gears. The front derailer handles the shifting on your chainrings and is usually controlled by your left-hand shifter. The rear derailer handles the shifting on your cassette or freewheel, and is usually controlled by your right-hand shifter.

Derailer hanger – a part of the frame where the rear derailleur is attached. It is usually an integrated part of the frame on steel and titanium bikes, but is a separate, replaceable piece on aluminum and carbon fiber bikes.

Drop bar – the type of handlebar found on road racing bikes, with the half-circle-shaped curved ends that extend below the top, flatter part of the bar.

Dropouts – the U-shaped notches at the rear of the bike frame, and at the bottom ends of the front fork legs, where the wheels are held in place. So-called because if you loosen the bolts holding a wheel in place, the wheel “drops out.”

Fixed gear – a type of bicycle that has a single gear and does not have a freewheel or cassette/freehub mechanism, so you are unable to coast. If the wheels are moving, you have to be pedaling. “Fixie” for short. More at TECH TALK: BIKE COMPONENTS FOR BEGINNERS

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Best Running Shoes for Triathletes

Best Running Shoes

“Reviewing the best running shoes for Triathlon. Read it now!”

Best Running Shoes for Triathletes

There are several factors you need to consider when buying a new pair of running shoes. They are:

Flexgrooves
With the current trend for more natural-feeling running, flexibility has been increased in many shoes, with some models having lengthways grooves designed to help guide your foot gently in a straight-forwards line

Arch support
Many manufacturers are paring down their support features but you’ll still see plastic arch bridges in some to help control excessive pronation (rolling in) and to aid a smooth ride

Outsole
Durability and traction are the two things you want from your outsole: sticky, black rubber compounds should help you claw over wet concrete while more aggressive tread patterns can help if you run off road

Upper
The fabric part of the shoe should be breathable and quick drying. Overlays on the upper can help add support, while special lacing designs locking into the upper can help cradle your foot for a more secure feeling

Midsole
In traditional everyday running shoes, the midsole contains most of the technology you’re paying for: light, bouncy foam or gel for shock protection and denser foam or plastic units to help control pronation

Inner
The inside of the shoe should be seam-free to keep you clear of cuts. Look for soft, brushed material, a thick, padded tongue for comfort and, in more expensive shoes, plush sockliners for extra cushioning

1. Puma faas 500
The Simplicity of the FAAS line’s look is down to the one-piece FAASfoam midsole running the length of the shoe. Stability features are limited to a split heel and supportive mesh round the midfoot in the upper, so it’s a light and bouncy shoe, which our tester liked better for faster runs. The plush step-in feeling, thick tongue and secure-feeling upper makes it a good racing choice, with the low weight and seam-free inner reinforcing that. It offers plenty of protection for heel-strikers but midfoot or forefoot strikers will find it slappy. Low breathability (compared with other shoes tested here) lets down its racing potential but grip was great even on slick roads

Verdict
Plush, light and neutral shoe that favours heel strikers.

2. New Balance 870 v2
There was a time you wouldn’t get any change from 350g for a stability shoe, but ever lighter foams and less intrusive support features have changed that. The latest 870 is a good example, with new Revlite foam doing the cushioning honours and just a small, split section of higher density foam providing medial support; it’s designed for light overpronators. Nevertheless our tester found it rigid and very stable compared with others we tested, and good for heel-strikers rather than midfoot or forefoot runners. Despite a low 8mm heel-to-toe drop, road feel isn’t great, possibly because of the less flexible outsole than others we tried. The shoe’s inner caused us no problems though.

Verdict
Light shoe for overpronators but not the fastest feeling or most flexible. More at Best Running Shoes For Triathlon

You can also watch this video for more on the Best Running Shoes:

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