Ironman Hawaii 2016 Results Pro Men Triathlon

Hey, what’s up triathletes? Taren here. Ironman Hawaii 2016 is over. Today, we’re going to be running down what happened in the men’s race, who won, how it unfolded, and why I’m here in the office to get this video ready for you until four in the morning. Stick around for it. At the start of the day, a lot of people were expecting a very fast race. It didn’t seem like it was going to be too hot out there, too humid, and the water was fairly calm, despite a few rollers. The cannon went off at for the men’s race, as it has for the last few years, and Jan Frodeno jumped out to a very early lead.

The swim ended up going into two packs, with Jan Frodeno taking one line and Andy Potts taking another. By the time they got to the pier, they merged, and Andy Potts jumped out to a short lead, but in the end, Harry Wilshire became the first athlete out of the water in Ironman Kona. He lead a very large group that featured the perennial leader, Andy Potts, from the U.S.A., Jan Frodeno, as I mentioned, Paul Matthews, and Marco Albers. It was a fast swim, going 2 minutes and 50 seconds faster than 2016. A personal favorite of mine and a pre-race favorite, fellow Canadian Brent McMahon was also in that pack, just 8 seconds back. Sebastian Kienle was over 5 minutes back, but that’s nothing new to Kienle. He typically races from the back, having to catch up on the bike. As expected, Kienle got right up to the bike by the end of 30 miles.

The men’s bike race ended up getting clustered up at the front a lot. Some might call it drafting a lot. The top twenty Ironman athletes were all within 40 seconds of the leader. That is a racer every two seconds. That doesn’t sound like 12 meters of clearance to me. Jan Frodeno 00:01:38] was right up there in the front, as he was last year, not letting anyone get away from him, but it seemed like he was staying very smooth, so that he had enough energy to conserve himself and be fresh on the run.

Luke McKenzie, a former second-place finisher, got up to the front, even taking the lead at around the 25-mile mark. Andreas Raelert, who’s probably the most talented athlete to never have won in Kona, was actually in that front pack, which he hasn’t been for a few years. Unfortunately, he ended up getting into the sin bin, serving a 5-minute penalty, as my buddy, Brent McMahon did. Both of them ended up not being real contenders at the end of the day. Mickey Weiss was the leader at the half-way turnaround point at Hawi. He was on the brand-new, Diamondback triathlon bike, which claims to be the fastest tri-bike in the world. He seemed to really want to make a point that day about how fast the bike was, but he blew up his legs, and after that half-way point at Hawi, he ended up just consistently falling back. By the end of the bike, everyone that you would expect to have a strong bike, did. Sebastian Kienle had established himself a very small lead, with Frodeno, Ben Hoffman, Luke McKenzie, and Tim O’Donnell very close behind.

Then, with all these athletes going out onto the race together and all looking really good, it was shaping up to be a pure running race for Ironman Hawaii 2016 World Championship. Two men, Frodeno and Kienle, established themselves early on as the freshest and the top contenders to be on that podium at the end of the day. They raced side-by-side, neck-in-neck, even exchanging a few jokes together, right up until the turn onto Queen K Highway, at which point, Jan Frodeno finally broke Kienle and established himself a 30-meter lead instantly once getting out into the barren lava fields.

At that point, in third place behind Kienle was fellow German, Andy Boercherer at two-and-a-half minutes back, establishing what we thought might be the ending German 1-2-3 placing. Close-in behind in fourth and fifth were Americans Ben Hoffman and Tim O’Donnell. Coming into the energy lab, Frodeno extended that lead slightly, but Kienle wasn’t far behind. He was running still very strong at a pace, but he wasn’t gaining very much on Jan Frodeno. Behind him, however, was a relative unknown, fellow German Patrick Lang, who was running a blistering 6:04-per-mile pace, running himself up from 20th place off the bike, to being a podium contender.

Jan Frodeno, just like last year, ended up being too much for everyone. He ran into town with a decisive lead, with no one else in sight. Once again, he proved that he is an Ironman triathlete like the world has never seen before. Jan defended his title in 8 hours, 6 minutes and 30 seconds, followed behind by Sebastian Kienle in second place at 8 hours, 10 minutes and change. With the run of the day, and the fastest run in Kona history, was that German Patrick Lang, who was ecstatic with a fourth-lace finish. Shortly behind, in fourth place, was Ben Hoffman, who again, was the top American in the field.

This was an amazing day with amazing performances. All told, it was the second-fastest podium finish in Kona history. Everyone suffered. Everyone worked for it, and everyone is consistently getting faster year after year. If you’re interested in what happened in the women’s race, I will link that up here, and in the description below where I do the recap on the women’s side of things. Congratulations to all the podium finishers, all the age-group finishers. Kona is a magical place and be proud of what you’ve accomplished today. As always, triathletes, happy and hard training, and good luck in your next triathalon. It’s late and I’m going to flub my way through this, but we’ll do it.

Favorite of mine and a fav- Oh my God..

As found on Youtube

Triathlon Swimming: Drafting on the Swim

 

“Want to swim faster? Want to try drafting on the swim? Check out these Triathlon swimming tips now!”

Do you want to swim faster with less effort? Do you want to exit a triathlon swim fresh and ready for the bike? Do you want to focus less on navigating all over the course, and more on looking for fishies while you swim? If so, draft.

Drafting in a triathlon swim is something ALL the pros do, and almost none of the age groupers do. Its 100% legal, and makes a huge difference in your swim speed, and how cooked you are after the swim.
Just to reemphasize. Drafting in the swim is always legal. No passing zones, no time limits. Go crazy.

How do you draft effectively in the swim:

  1. Don’t try to draft for the first few minutes after the start- its too crazy, and you probably wont draft the right person
  2. Focus on drafting in draft friendly conditions- crowded swim courses, not too wavy, and with good visibility in the water so you can see everyone else.
  3. Go really hard for the first few minutes before drafting. Remember you will rest once drafting, and going extra hard at first makes sure the person you do draft is a good swimmer
  4. Once you are tired from going for say 5 minutes hard on your own, find the right person to draft
  5. You want someone from your swim wave (you can check their cap color) who preferably is making a lot of bubbles so you can keep track of them easily, and is swimming in the right direction and who looks like they know what they are doing enough that they wont grab the next buoy or swim way off course. Ideally a bigger swimmer is best, as they make for a bigger draft.

OK so now you Swim Draftingknow WHO to draft, but HOW do you draft?
“Behind Drafting” (this is the easiest)

    1. Swim right behind your draftee. Look to see their feet, and use their bubble trail to follow them. Feel for the swirl in the water that their kick makes with your hands
    2. Once close, get in the optimal position- you want your hands as they enter the water to go slightly to the outside of their feet, and at full fingertip extension you want to be either just behind them or have your hands wider and overlapping with their feet.
    3. Relax. You will suddenly have to ease way up on your effort, and go the same speed. It will feel like the swimmer in front of you slowed way down. They didnt. THis is the whole point of drafting- going really fast wtih no effort
    4. Every few minutes if you think your swimmer is slowing down, you can swim a bi to the side of the swimmer you are drafting to prove to yourself that they haven’t slowed down. You will feel the resistance go up suddenly. Once you have re-convinced yourself that the swimmer is going fast enough, get back in that draft
    5. Spend the rest of the swim leg in that spot. Relax. Mentally prepare for the bike. Focus not on swimming hard, but on swimming right in the proper spot.

More at Triathlon Swim Tips: How to Draft on the Swim

You can also watch this video for more Triathlon Swimming tips:

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Investing in Good Running Shoes

Investing in Good Running Shoes

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“It’s always best to invest on good running shoes. Why? Read the reasons below!”

The best running shoes are shoes that will be kind and gentle on your feet throughout any running exercise. This benefit will reflect itself in its most striking way immediately after a workout, when the way your feet feel then is a good indication of whether you have the right pair of running shoes or not. A good number of people even today still do not realize–or underestimate–the importance of investing in a good pair of running shoes. These are the kinds of people who awkwardly show up for track and field events or even light running exercises in the bulkiest pair of basketball shoes that they can find. These kinds of people are also the ones who will have massive amounts of pain in their feet right after the running exercise.

Avoid Blisters and Other Pains
If you use any kind of shoes–even ones for other types of athletic purposes–when you run, you will end up with the most sore feet ever. A further taboo is picking the incorrect kind of socks to make matters even that much worse. In example, cotton socks are a big no-no when it comes to picking socks for running because of their tendency to cause friction against your skin. So if you are wearing unwieldy and inappropriate shoes–such as basketball shoes–and cotton socks that are thick, you should expect to see your feet in bad shape after your running exercise. It is noteworthy to point out that this adverse effect will happen quite quickly, too. So if you want to avoid blisters and the effects of sore feet and the front of your legs, invest in a good pair of running shoes.

Better Fit to Your Foot
Good running shoes will do one thing and provide one benefit first and foremost: a snug and well-shaped fit that is tailored to your foot as much as possible. A good pair of running shoes will also make your foot feel lighter as you run, and a reason for this is because of how well it takes to the shape of your foot. The problem that is caused by the rubbing of your heel against the wrong kind of shoe during running–which creates the onset of blisters–is also absent with the right pair of running shoes. You will not feel this nagging rubbing against your heel. These days, many athletic shoe stores provide in-store machine tests which show your foot type and, consequently, what type of running shoe best fits you.

Selecting Good Shoes
Selecting a good pair of running shoes comes down to pronation. This term simply refers to the degree your foot rotates toward the inside when you run. There are two kinds of runners: One who has too much pronation (whose foot rotates too much while running) and one who has insufficient pronation (whose foot barely rotates inward when running). The best way to get a pair that is right for you is by visiting a shoe store that emphasizes selling running shoes. These stores usually have a knowledgeable staff that will even let you try running around in the shoe. More at Why It’s Important to Invest in Good Running Shoes

Check out this video for more tips on choosing Good Running Shoes:

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Bike Components: A Beginner’s Bike

Must Know Bike Components

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“Many materials and technologies are used to build different types of bikes. Below is a beginner’s guide to bike components. Read it now”

Buying a new bike or accessories can often be bewildering to the novice; the folks working in the shop almost seem to be speaking a different language. It’s almost as bad as trying to pick out a personal computer.

From our perspective, sometimes it’s hard to tell when we’re using everyday language and when we’re slipping into technical jargon. We have to really ask questions to make sure we’re on the same page with a customer and really understand what they are looking for, and often it’s just a matter of making sure we agree on the meaning of the words we are using. For example, we sometimes get people asking for a “wheel,” when all they really need is a new tire. On the other hand, we’ve gotten really perplexed looks when we’ve handed somebody a “rim,” when they were really looking for an entire wheel.

So, breaking down the language barrier is an important step in productive relationships between bike shop customers and bike shop employees. To that end, here is a glossary providing a breakdown of the anatomy of the bicycle.

Bar ends – the angled extensions attached to the ends of some flat handlebars and riser handlebars that provide an alternate place to rest your hands.

Bottom bracket – the collection of ball bearings and spindle housed within the bottom bracket shell of the frame, which provides the “shaft” mechanism on which the crank arms turn.

Braze-ons – threaded sockets that may or may not be present on the bike frame that provide a place to attach accessories such as bottle cages, cargo racks, and fenders.

Cage – the preferred fancy name for water bottle holder.

Cassette – the collection of gears that is attached to the rear wheel on most modern bicycles (see “Freewheel”).

Chainrings – the gears that are attached to the right-hand crank arm nearer to the front of the bike. A bike with two chainrings is said to have a “double crank;” a bike with three chainrings is said to have a “triple crank.”

Cog – a single gear on a cassette or freewheel gear cluster, or the single rear gear on a fixed-gear bike.

Crank arms – the pedals screw into these; these bolt onto the bottom bracket spindle.

Cyclocomputer – the preferred fancy word for an electronic speedometer/odometer.

Derailer – the device that is bolted to the frame that handles the job of moving the chain from one gear to another when you shift gears. The front derailer handles the shifting on your chainrings and is usually controlled by your left-hand shifter. The rear derailer handles the shifting on your cassette or freewheel, and is usually controlled by your right-hand shifter.

Derailer hanger – a part of the frame where the rear derailleur is attached. It is usually an integrated part of the frame on steel and titanium bikes, but is a separate, replaceable piece on aluminum and carbon fiber bikes.

Drop bar – the type of handlebar found on road racing bikes, with the half-circle-shaped curved ends that extend below the top, flatter part of the bar.

Dropouts – the U-shaped notches at the rear of the bike frame, and at the bottom ends of the front fork legs, where the wheels are held in place. So-called because if you loosen the bolts holding a wheel in place, the wheel “drops out.”

Fixed gear – a type of bicycle that has a single gear and does not have a freewheel or cassette/freehub mechanism, so you are unable to coast. If the wheels are moving, you have to be pedaling. “Fixie” for short. More at TECH TALK: BIKE COMPONENTS FOR BEGINNERS

You can also watch this video for more Bike Components:

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Triathlon Transition: Tips for a Faster Triathlon

Faster Triathlon Transition Tips

“Simple tips to help you do a faster triathlon transition. Read them now!”

trans

Whether this is your first triathlon or you’ve reached a point that your life is defined by your training and pursuit of the podium, making a fast transition is important. It is the one area where minutes can be shaved off your time and you can have the satisfaction that you’ve minimized the loafing time. With any event it is the after event thoughts that plague, “why didn’t I push it harder on the bike or the run? Could I have been faster in my transitions?”

Practice, practice, practice. A week before the race may not be the time to start practicing your transitions, but I suspect for the majority of folks that’s when it happens. When your training and doing bricks (run to bike or visa versa) set your self up a mini transition area and see what works for you.

Set your bike up and remember where you’ve parked it. Some folks have used balloons or luggage ties – something colorful to draw attention to your spot. If you are on asphalt colored chalk is a good way to mark where your bike is. Trim your bib number and then tape your bid number on your bike on the seat post to keep things aerodynamic and make sure you can ride without it flapping, rubbing, or annoying you.

Layout your towel – this really isn’t for drying off after the swim its for marking your territory and keeping your feet clean and comfy while you get your shoes on and off. Layout your helmet and glasses. Put your running shoes on top of your bib and racebelt so it doesn’t blow away. Have your socks, hat, and what ever race food you plan on taking with you in a neat and sequential order.

If you are running without socks, put body glide on the heals of both shoes to prevent any hotspots.

T1 – getting out of the swim a lot people are dizzy and wobbly so be cautious.

Getting out the wetsuit: before getting out of the water – pull the neck of your wetsuit and get a good gulp of water down the front, this will eliminate some of the vacuum and stickiness. Pull your zip, remove the arms in quick fashion and kick out your legs while keeping one leg on the wetsuit.

Always put your helmet on first, then glasses, bib number (turned around to the back) and shoes. For the serious folks have your shoes clipped in and ready to go and use a rubber band to keep them parallel for easy mounting and slide the shoes on while on the move – this takes some practice. More at MAKING FASTER TRIATHLON TRANSITIONS

You can also check out this video for more Triathlon Transition tips:

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Ironman Training: Rules to Remember

Ironman Training Rules

“Getting ready for your Ironman training? Make sure you list down these rules to remember. Know what they are below!”

Ironman Training Rules

There’s an old saying that goes, all roads lead to Rome. In the triathlon world, all roads eventually and hopefully lead to Kona and the Ironman World Championships.

If you’ve been bitten by the triathlon bug chances are you’ll want to go long and race your first half- and full-distance IM.

Here are a few tips for any triathlete who wants to go long and step up to the half and full-IM distance.

TRAIN EVERY DAY
It takes a minimum of 13 hours of training per week to get in shape for an Ironman race. That means you’ll be training almost every day of the week.

After all, you not only have to swim, bike and run during the race, but you have to beat the cutoff times.

Participants in competing in the half- or full-Ironman events will be pulled from the course if they’re unable to finish each leg of the event in the set amount of time.

DON’T FAKE IT
To some small extent you can fake the training for both an Ironman and half IM race. In other words, you can finish both of these race distances without completely putting in the time to train, but you’ll hate the race.

There are few things more miserable in life than spending 17 hours on an Ironman course hating every painful swim stroke, bike pedal and running step. Sure, there are amateur athletes who’ve finished without putting in the hard work, but they just spent over $500 on the entry for a day of self-inflicted pain.

THE FOURTH IRONMAN SEGMENT
You probably know that a triathlon of any length consists of a swim, bike and run, but in order to succeed at the half- and full-Ironman distance you’ll have to learn a fourth discipline: nutrition.

Unlike the sprint or Olympic distance triathlon, the half and full IM becomes about how fast you can swim, bike and run, and just as importantly how you can take in enough calories to keep from bonking. More at The 4 Rules of Ironman Training

Watch this video for more Ironman Training tips:

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